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    SC Conversations: Vile Days with Gary Indiana and Bruce Hainley

    Gary Indiana and Bruce Hainley talk for the launch of Vile Days, a collection of Indiana’s Village Voice column from the 1980s. From March 1985 through June 1988 in the Village Voice, Gary Indiana reimagined the weekly art column. Thirty years later, Vile Days brings together for the first time all of those vivid dispatches, too long stuck in archival limbo, so that the fire of Indiana's observations can burn again. In the midst of Reaganism, the grim toll of AIDS, and the frequent jingoism of postmodern theory, Indiana found a way to be the moment's Baudelaire. He turned the art review into a chronicle of life under siege. Indiana also remained alert to the aesthetic consequence of sumo wrestling, flower shows, public art, corporate galleries, and furniture design. Edited and prefaced by Bruce Hainley, Vile Days provides an opportunity to track Indiana's emergence as one of the most prescient writers of his generation. (Semiotext(e) / Active Agents and MIT Press).

    Gary Indiana is a novelist, playwright, critic, essayist, filmmaker, and artist. Hailed by the Guardian as “one of the most important chroniclers of the modern psyche,” and by the Observer as "one of the most woefully underappreciated writers of the last 30 years," he published a memoir, I Can Give You Anything But Love, in 2015. He is also the author of Three Month Fever: The Andrew Cunanan Story and Resentment: A Comedy.

    Bruce Hainley is the author of Under the Sign of [sic]: Sturtevant's Volte-Face and Art & Culture, both published by Semiotext(e). The editor of Commie Pinko Guy, he wrote, with John Waters, Art—A Sex Book. He co-chairs the Graduate Art program at ArtCenter College of Design and is a contributing editor at Artforum.